Khat  –  COT, kat, qat, chat, gat, graba, tohai, tschat, mirraa

Khat – COT, kat, qat, chat, gat, graba, tohai, tschat, mirraa

Khat

Khat (pronounced COT) is known by over 40 different street names including, kat, qat, chat, gat, graba, tohai, tschat, and mirraa. Khat is a stimulant derived from Catha Edulis, a 6-12-foot flowering evergreen shrub. The fresh young leaves of the shrub have been consumed where the plant is cultivated, primarily in East Africa and the Arabian peninsula.

Khat

There, chewing “graba” predates the use of coffee and is used in a similar social context.It is estimated that over 10 million people use and abuse “graba” today, primarily in the Middle East. Khat is used for its stimulant effects. The effects are similar to but less intense than those of methamphetamine or cocaine.

Khat

Fresh leaves are chewed and dried leaves are smoked, made into a paste and chewed, or brewed in tea. Used moderately, “Graba alleviates fatigue and reduces appetite. Long term use or abuse can cause insomnia, anorexia, gastric disorders, depression, liver damage and cardiac complications.

Manic behavior, delusional behavior, violence, suicidal depression, hallucinations, paranoia and khat-induced psychosis have also been reported. “Graba” contains a number of chemicals among which are two controlled substances, cathinone (Schedule I) and cathine (Schedule IV).

Khat

As the leaves mature or dry, cathinone is converted to cathine which significantly reduces its stimulatory properties. Cathinone is approximately 10 more times more potent than cathine and is only present in fresh leaves. Cathine, the secondary active ingredient in “graba”, does not lose much of its potency with age as with cathinone. Leaves less than 48 hours old are preferred to ensure a maximum potency of cathinone. However, Khat can be preserved by freezing, the same way that vegetables and meats are kept fresh in the United States.

More information in the Brochure.

Other sources:

Preventing Chronic Disease | Habitual Khat and Concurrent …

www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2014/13_0234.htm

Khat (Catha edulis) is widely used in East Africa and the Middle East, often in combination with tobacco smoking. Sleep disturbance has been linked …

CDC Stacks | Habitual Khat and Concurrent Khat and Tobacco …

stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/23248

Introduction  (Catha edulis) is widely used in East Africa and the Middle East, often in combination with tobacco smoking. Sleep disturbance has …

Preventing Chronic Disease: July 2008: 07_0137

www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2008/Jul/07_0137.htm

Volume 5: No. 3, July 2008. ORIGINAL RESEARCH Association of Smoking  (Catha edulis Forsk) Use With High Blood Pressure Among Adults in Addis …

[TXT] Introduction

stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/23248/cdc_23248_DS3.txt

Khat (Catha edulis) is widely used in East Africa and the Middle East, often in combination with tobacco smoking. Sleep disturbance has been linked …

Other Sources

Drug Identification Guide

CDC Facts

CDC Addiction Info

CDC Overdose Stats

CDC Substance Treatment

Whitehouse Drug Free Communities

Samhsa Workplace Programs

Drug Free

Federal Register Codification

2 Comments

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